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I know, I know, sometimes practicing those scales can get a little monotonous.

But, it is a necessity if you need to get better at guitar.

I really don’t think there is any realistic way around it.

However, I learned a long time ago when I was figuring these scales out that I can “spice it up” a little.

So, I would practice them in a slightly different way by playing the notes in different orders.

It kept my interest up. And as a bonus it helped with my coordination and dexterity too.

One exercise that I really like, and one that I teach my private lesson students, are what I call “Quads”.

It is simply ascending the scale 4 notes at a time, where your first note for each pattern ascends one at a time.

Kinda like this: note 1- note 2- note 3- note 4, then: note 2- note 3- note 4- note 5, then: note 3- note 4- note 5- note 6, etc.

Here is a picture of the 5 Major Scale patterns (courtesy of the Guitarists Scale Book by Peter Vogt):

I made a TAB with the first form you see above using the G Major scale as an example. Click the link and check it out:

Quad Pattern TAB

In the video below I use one major scale pattern to use as an example.

But you can use in on any major scale pattern.

You can also use it on any minor scale pattern.

Heck, you can use it on any scale pattern.

Have fun!

***As an added bonus and challenge: start using a metronome for this exercise. Use a tempo that works for you by playing each note on the click.***

Good luck!

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